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Nearly a Year After the Storm, State Has Only Dispersed 1% of FEMA Aid for Irma

June 20th, 2018 by Jake Stofan
Hurricane Irma caused an estimated $50 billion in damage when it hit last Fall.
While the one year anniversary of the storm is less than three months away, federal aid hasn’t made it to local communities.
“Cities that are on the frontlines are having to figure out will the money be there or not be there as they prepare their budgets,” said Jeff Branch, a lobbyist for the Florida League of Cities.
The State Division of Emergency Management has received more than $108 million from FEMA, but only 1% (about $1.1 million) has actually been given to local governments.
204 communities that have applied are still waiting for aid.
“DEM says it’s FEMA. FEMA says it’s DEM,” said Branch.
It’s not uncommon for federal aid to be slow following a disaster.
In Leon County, the vast majority of FEMA aid for Hurricane Hermine, which hit the panhandle in 2016 was only received a few months ago.
“We understand that the process for FEMA reimbursement takes some amount of time,” said Mathieu Cavell, Assistant to the Leon County Administrator for Community Relations.
While Leon County was able to cover the cost with reserves that’s not the case for all communities.
“Cities are having to decide how to figure out whether or not services will be reduced or services will be cut,” said Branch.
Cavell says it speaks to the importance of having a disaster fund in place before a storm hits.
“Because when disaster strikes it’s too late to have the policies in place that align you best for FEMA reimbursement,” said Cavell.
There have been cases of local government receiving FEMA dollars, only to have to pay back a portion years later.
Part of the delay this time around is the state trying to make sure the expenses are justified.
In a statement, DEM pointed the finger at local governments for the slow dispersement, noting nearly 80% of the federal funds remain unrequested.
DEM says it’s waiting on documentation from local communities before it can disperse the vast majority of the $13.6 million that have been requested.

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